Dave Crossland

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What A Repeat Button Was Made For

What A Repeat Button Was Made For

What A Repeat Button Was Made For

Dave Crossland walks the same musical roads as Jimmy LaFave, Kevin Welch, and John Stewart.  They all have a knack for pulling back layers of the proverbial American dream to expose the real faces marked by sin and salvation, hope and despair.  Cloaked hypocrisy and naked humanity run together down the same wide-open highways and narrow city streets.  You get the feeling Crossland has spent plenty of time on both, took it all in, and is now prepared to spit it back out with elegant lyrics and a fervent rock backbeat.

To get a handle on his scope, consider "When The Buffalo Come Back," "New York City Rose," and "American Boulevard."  First he nails the industrial blight caused by the "iron horse...rumbling through the valleys and the plains."  Next he recalls finding romance and a rose in the tall glass of Manhattan and finally he makes a quiet plea for peace and equality and a place where "you and me can walk anywhere we want to."  The title track falls into a similar vein with the question "where are my dreams?"

Crossland deals with the recent loss of his mother tenderly and beautifully in "Mother's Cross," but it's "Run To California," with its sweeping chorus, that is the album's masterpiece.  Full of determined optimism and love of the most unselfish kind, it's what a repeat button was made for.

With Molly's Street Dave Crossland makes a flawless return to form.